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City Plan Commission Meeting – XTO’s NAS Gas Drilling Permit – Dallas

September 15, 2010

There’s an important City of Dallas City Plan Commission public hearing taking place tomorrow afternoon (9/16) where they’ll be voting to approve XTO Energy’s SUP for gas drilling the Naval Air Station (Mountain Creek Lake). We need your help in contacting the Commissioners to voice your dissatisfaction with how the City of Dallas is NOT engaging in widespread public discussion on how urban gas drilling will play a role in our neighborhoods and the future of our city. If what’s happening to the west of us in the Barnett Shale is any indication of things to come, it’s time Dallasites request more transparency and understanding into what the City does and doesn’t know about the practice of horizontal hydraulic fracturing in densely populated communities.

Please contact the CPC Chair, Joe Alcantar (214-670-3086), and CP Commissioners with your questions and comments, and ask them to “PULL” this agenda item from the docket until city-wide public notice and participation take place.

Dallas City Council Contacts

Attend – Thursday, September 16th
Dallas City Hall, 1500 Marillia Street, 75201
– Briefings: Room 5ES @ 11:00a
– Public Hearing: Council Chambers @ 1:30p

Questions:
– What are the effects on air and water quality near drilling sites? How will these conditions affect my health over short or long-terms?
– What are the effects of nearby drilling sites/wells on my short and long-term property value?
– What chemicals are used in the practice of “fracking?” Are they toxic and carcinogenic to human and animal health? Are the lease royalty and bonus benefits worth the risk of possible health implications?
– How safe are the open, on-site “frack” ponds and what happens to the “frack” fluid chemicals as they’re “evaporated” into the air near our residences?
– How well are all these drilling sites regulated, monitored and enforced? Have there been any “accidents” near urban drilling sites or residential located pipelines?
– Do the effects of urban gas drilling affect the DFW air quality (since our region currently doesn’t meet EPA ozone standards)?
– Is XTO/Exxon using gas industry “best practices” to eliminate fugitive toxic air emissions on site equipment?
– How informed is the City Plan Commission and City Council on the issue of urban gas drilling? Which experts we’re consulted and what was the decision-making process used that evaluated the risks, benefits and trade-offs?

– Add your questions in the Comments section!!

3 Comments leave one →
  1. Kim permalink
    September 15, 2010 9:33 pm

    How will the city monitor air and water quality? Are they taking baseline samples before drilling so they will know if there are problems down the road? And who is going to pay for the test on air quality – the city or the drillers? And the industry says that fracking fluid is mostly (99%) sand and water. If there is 30+ million gallons of water used then just how many gallons of chemicals makes up that 1%? I’m not good with math but isn’t that 300,000 gallons? 300,000 gallons of unidentified chemicals that can certainly cause harm to the soil and water if a spill were to occur.

    • concerned64 permalink
      September 18, 2010 8:03 am

      Kim
      there are NO plans to monitor the air. The feds don’t require it. The state doesn’t require it.
      The industry doesn’t want to do it. Guess why? When asked what they could do in order to monitor the air XTO said, “I guess we could move somebody out there to live”. Yes, they will give up their recipe to the city but only after the drill is set and ready to go. How’s that for some answers. So, if you are uncomfortable with these answers, think about contacting the city planning commissioners and let them know you’re concerns.

  2. September 18, 2010 1:55 am

    Just saw this in the SUP on Page 6:

    XTO Energy Inc., Officers

    James L. Death, Senior Vice President – Land

    It’s just a name….but it fits so so perfectly into the gas drilling territory.

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