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Size does matter

February 2, 2011

Reprinted from: Greers Ferry Lake Natural Gas Watch on Facebook

 

414,492 gallons of diesel fuel is insignificant.

Our best pal and BFF at AOGC, Larry Bengal has decided that 414,492 gallons of diesel fuel is insignificant. He made this statement in a trade magazine today.

“The amount of diesel fuel reported by the lawmakers was so small as to be insignificant, Bengal said.”

http://www.platts.com/RSSFeedDetailedNews/RSSFeed/NaturalGas/6795228

 

I did some cocktail napkin figuring and its around 63 of these tankers worth of diesel fuel that Larry Bengal deems as insignificant.

 

That seems like a pretty significant amount when peoples health is in question, but Larry Bengal continues with:

But Bengal said the actual volume of diesel fuel might be much less than the chart appears to suggest.

 

“As you read those charts, it talks about diesel fuel components in the frack fluid. It doesn’t say the actual amount of diesel. The charts are misleading as to what they’re saying,” he said.

 

So this would have been a REALLY good time for Larry Bengal to actually say how much diesel fuel HAD been injected. He doesn’t, I read the entire article and no amount was forthcoming. I’m going with the 414,492 gallons figure until Larry Bengal proves otherwise.

 

But he does go on to say:

“We regulate the use of a diesel frack if diesel was the base fluid of the frack,” he said. “If it’s a small component of a water frack, that wouldn’t require a permit.”

 

So he doesn’t deny that diesel fuel is used in the process that’s supposedly safe, he just says that its a small component.

 

“We regulate the use of a diesel frack if diesel was the base fluid of the frack,” he said. “If it’s a small component of a water frack, that wouldn’t require a permit.”

 

So lets review some industry numbers from our pals at Chesapeake. They claim the chemicals are a small amount compared to the water and sand.  A typical frac job is 99.5% water and sand leaving .5% chemicals. A typical frac job is 3 to 7 million gallons of water and sand so that’s 15000 to 35000 gallons of chemicals.

http://www.chk.com/Media/FayettevilleMediaKits/Fayetteville_Hydraulic_Fracturing_Fact_Sheet.pdf

http://www.hydraulicfracturing.com/Water-Usage/Pages/Information.aspx

 

So Larry’s  small component of diesel fuel could theoretically be anything up to 35000 gallons on a 7 million gallon frac job because that’s only .5% of the total job. When you look at the total figures of how much stuff they use that leaves quite a bit of wiggle room for defining what a small amount might be.

 

Also he appears to confirm what the Southwestern Energy (SWN) told the Canadians that diesel was used in all phase of drilling and in a large number of the frac jobs. He admits they use diesel fuel, tries to say its insignificant without giving any clarifying amounts, and then expects us to believe that what they are using is safe.

We get a constant reminder from the industry and their spokes people claiming what they are using is safe, while they are steadily refusing to admit what they are using.I don’t think diesel fuel is all that safe and I don’t want it anywhere near my food and water.

 

This diesel fuel revelation leaves me with more questions than answers.

Does BTEX laden diesel fuel sound safe to you?

Is diesel fuel going to be one of the “trade secret” items that they aren’t going to talk about in the future?

If they think diesel fuel is safe then what other nasties are the pumping in there?

Who exactly does Larry Bengal work for and does he answer to the citizens or the industry?

If Larry Bengal answers to the industry, then who’s looking out for us?

 

My guess as to the answer to the last question is nobody because anyone that dares question what this industry is doing gets shouted down as quickly as they can stand up.

One Comment leave one →
  1. February 3, 2011 3:19 pm

    The people that work for this shale gas industry are such apologists…they are truly pathetic.

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